Old regulations gets LeoVegas in trouble

Operators who are serious about taking a share of the UK market knows how complex the regulations are in Britain. And this is truer than ever as the UK Gambling Commission (UKGC) is tightening its grip on operators.

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Which means that older and ongoing customer disputes will surface and will keep on making the headlines in 2019. An undoubtedly, it’s what’s happening for LeoVegas, and its sister company. In fact, they’re making the headlines for an incident that occurred in 2018.

A problem with blocked account

Now before diving deeper into this story, let’s take a few moments to review the current legislation about blocked accounts in the UK. The truth is that not everyone knows that when closing an account for responsible gambling on a brand. Well, all accounts on the company sister brands are closed too.

Nowadays, most casinos online have the technology in place to block problem gamblers from opening accounts on sister brands or white labels. But back in 2018, it wasn’t the case. And this is what got LeoVegas into hot water it seems.

Apparently, a player managed to deposit £20,000 with his mother’s credit card on LeoVegas sister brand. And that’s after closing its account on LeoVegas. According to the reports, an email with an enticing promotion ended up in the player’s inbox. And this is what caused the issue we’re reporting on today.

Old regulations gets LeoVegas in trouble

New tools and process are in place

Not long after the complaint ended up on the UKGC’s desk, LeoVegas Group were heavily fined. And they’ve also introduced new procedures to make sure this doesn’t happen again. But the operator couldn’t help but mention to the UKGC and the press that.

“The acquisitions in the UK have entailed complexity. In terms of synchronising databases, routines and processes.” But hopefully, the new process will guarantee that the operator stays out of the headlines. At least when it comes to not following the UKGC’s guidelines to the letter.